Why Does My Hip Still Hurt After Surgery?

On May 11, 2011, in Pain FAQ's, by JonHyman

Many patients contact us for advice regarding their concerns over feeling ‘the same pain I had before surgery’ even though they are a few weeks post-op. It’s important to note that simply saying I had “hip arthroscopy” doesn’t really disclose enough detail to have your concerns adequately addressed. It is important that you, as a patient, understand what was actually done during your surgery. You need to understand if you had a labral repair (with suture anchors implanted) or a labral debridement, or shaving of bone (osteoplasty) or cleaning out of the membrane (synovectomy) or whatever was done. Then you are an informed patient. That also enables you to ask questions with more detail and get better answers.

Since the labrum takes several weeks to heal after hip arthroscopy and labral repair, the tissue is technically still torn for the first couple of months after the

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surgery. Therefore, it’s not surprising that there would still be some pain in the area of the labral tear….until it heals completely – which may not be for 2-3 months after the surgery. There are a lot of reasons why you can still be in pain AFTER hip arthroscopy surgery: tendinitis, bursitis, scar tissue, altered gait/walking, nerve irritation from traction, low back pain, SI joint dysfunction, swelling etc, etc. Have an open discussion with your surgeon to get a clearer understanding of the expectations re: pain relief that are specific to your case.

For more info, visit our website: www.hiparthroscopydoctor.com

90 Responses to Why Does My Hip Still Hurt After Surgery?

  1. Shawnda says:

    I am 1 year post-op from a labral tear repair and osteoplasty and I’m still in a lot of pain. Working out does not help and I sleep with an ice pack on my hip every night. I did OK between months 6-9 but after that it all went down hill. My surgeon is very experienced with this procedure so I am very disappointed with my current pain level a year later. I was told that I could not mess up what he fixed but I am starting to question that. I am just waiting to feel normal again and to move around trusting my hip without fear of extreme pain.
    Tampa, FL

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry for your pain. I have several thoughts:
      1. The pain may not be coming from the hip joint, and could be coming from other areas nearby your joint.
      2. There may have been some underlying arthritis/cartilage damage in your joint before, and that problem is still there.
      3. You have more than one problem area
      4. You could be having complications

      A year later, you should not be having significant repair from a successful labral repair and osteoplasty. Either it didn’t heal properly or something else is going and and responsible for your pain. Sounds like you need some more diagnostic studies and likely an injection into your hip joint, with anesthetic and anti-inflammatory: to treat your pain/inflammation and rule out the origin of your pain.

  2. Olga Zamora says:

    I have 2 months after my labral and osteoplasty surgery the first month was no so painfull, but now I can not walk long distances only arround my home and I feel pain like something is touching a nerve and go along the front of my leg, could be a ciatic nerve I’m worse than before my susrgery
    Thank you
    Olga

  3. Jesse says:

    How long does it take for a hip surgery to not hurt….my brother recently broke his hip and had surgery and is in a lot of pain….

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry he’s still in pain. It depends upon the type of surgery, the patient’s pain threshold and the aftercare (PT, ice, medications, etc). Please be sure to raise this question with your surgeon to make sure your brother is getting the best care possible.

  4. I am a 40 year old firefighter who had hip arthroscopy, w pinser legion takedown, arthroscopic acetubular repair.There were 2 anchors inserted. I am 3 mos post op and still dealing with pain on a daily basis.I still cannot get up a flight of stairs without pain and have only 3 degrees of external rotation. I was told pre op that this surgery does not work for everyone.I opted for it because it was the only chance I had at getting back to full duty. I was recently given a cortisone shot to try and manage pain. My physical therapist believes I should get another mri while m y surgeon wants to wait another 6 agaonizing weeks.My question is: at what point do I throw up the white flag and accept that this didnt work for me,and has anyone else experienced anything close to this or dealt with any other issues after this surgery??

    • JonHyman says:

      Something doesn’t sound right for sure, but it is true, some patients heal more slowly. Many people still have discomfort 3 months out, but the type of pain you describe is not the norm. Perhaps your condition was worse than you are aware of? In any event your external rotation seems unusually limited. Certain things like nerve damage, infection, joint contracture should possibly be ruled out. Getting MRI’s this early often is unsatisfactory in terms of yielding useful information. That said, sometimes you have to check early if the patient is not doing well for inexplicable reasons. By six months out, you should be well on your way to recovery. Poor results then…consider it a failure…though you are on that course now… many patients have a sudden change for better in month 4, 5, or 6. Definitely worth reiterating your concern to your surgeon.

  5. my mom had her left hip replaced now we are a year after the surgery and she has a bad limp and is still in a lot of pain. she did everything she was told to do and had in home health care for recovery, now this far down the road the dr that did her surgery has rescheduled her for surgery and said that the large indentation at the incision site is not good and he needs to go in and “sew” the tissue back together as it didnt heal. what caused this? he wont tell us other than it shouldnt look like that and she should not be in this much pain.

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry for her difficulty. I sounds like a fascial hernia or dehiscence (detachment) of tendon or ligament that is usually repaired back once the hip replacement is installed. If these are issues, the reasons for non healing are many, including but not limited to:
      -poor biology, despite excellent technique, some people just don’t heal
      -poor technique, might not have been done well
      -poor bone quality, sometimes elderly or soft bone doesn’t hold sutures well
      -falls/trauma/overuse in the post surgery period
      -non-compliance with rehabilitation
      -overly aggressive rehabilitation”

      There may be other issues including leg length inequality, muscle weakness, nerve irritation, gait impairment that can contribute to pain. If at all possible, try to get a more transparent and clear understanding of her problems pre-op and what the solutions might look like. I know you are trying. Thanks for your inquiry.

  6. Leah says:

    I had hip surgery about a year and a half ago. I had the laberal fixed with three anchors put in. They also shaved the bone. And cut the hip flexor muscle. My injury had gone on for about 3 years before they finally figured out what was wrong (for about 2 years of that they told me I was faking). I am pretty young. I had my surgery 2 days after my 17th birthday. About 8 months after my surgery I started feeling pain again. I figured it was overuse because I was working about 100 hours a week in a seasonal restaurant for the summer. I finally went to my doctor that did my surgery concerning my pain. He put me on a steroid and told me it could be just inflammation from the hip flexor that had been cut. He said if it didn’t go away something was going on in the joint. Well, it didn’t go away. I work out about 6 days a week and try to strenghten my hip by find a great deal of difficulty because of the pain i’m in. I try to push through it and I have a pretty high pain tolerance but I don’t want to mess it up more. Physical therapy didn’t really work for me pre-op, but was told I was the fastest yet to recover post-op. Is it worth going back in, or do you think maybe it’s just soreness from a lot of use? I’m not sure. I’ve lost a lot of trust in doctors from many bad experiences.

    • JonHyman says:

      Your loss of trust is totally understandable. We doctors don’t get it right sometimes. That said, I do think letting your physician know that you are still hurting is important. You can get his/her advice, and then decide if you want to follow it or not. Without a diagnosis, or possible diagnoses, i would be reluctant to do more PT…as you don’t want to make it worse. Working out 6 days a week is good for some things, but it may be more than your hip can handle right now. Worth a check up.

  7. Johnm says:

    I had hip pain for a couple years prior to arthroscopy surgery it’s been almost 8 months since my surgery which also entailed removing extensive amounts of bone growth it took the doctors about 4 hours to complete the surgery

    I am 48 and realized that healing may take a while however I was told on my follow up visits that everything was great and that I was improving at an unanticipated rate I felt really good about this and was looking forward to being back to normal by the end of February but even though I have improved the pain is starting to be more of a dull constant 3 or 4 of a scale to 1-10 and I’m starting to notice stiffness again so I hope this isn’t an indication of more problems…

    • JonHyman says:

      Depending upon the nature of your specific problem, your recovery make take longer. Complete recovery can certainly take up to a year, but is often on the order of 6-9 months. If you feel you are not headed in the right direction, please check with your doctor. Patients with concomitant back pain, SI joint pain, piriformis or buttock pain, nerve problems or some osteoarthritis in their hips often take longer to recover, and their recovery may be less than ideal.

  8. JDavid says:

    Hello Dr Hyman,
    I recently had bilateral hip arthroscopic surgeries. My second surgery turned out to be the more damaged of the two. There was a labral tear and there was some cleaning, shaving of the bone and one anchor put in, which my first hip did not require. My Dr. says that the anchor will eventually be covered with a fiberous scar tissue and that it will not be taken out. I’m only 2 weeks out and starting physical therapy and I notice occasional sharp bursts of pain during some of the exercises. He had indicated to me that if there is no “pop” and the pain does not persist for more than 30 minutes, not to worry. He is confident that I will have a great recovery. So, 1) should I keep doing the exercises even though I feel occasional sharp pain, or should I wait another couple weeks before PT? 2) What should I beware of physically in the long haul? I’d like to start doing martial arts again.
    Thank You, 34 M US Navy.

    • JonHyman says:

      Thanks for your comment JDavid.
      The symptoms you are reporting are very common after successful hip arthroscopy surgery, so in and of themselves, they are not alarming or concerning. If you feel comfortable with your therapists and surgeon’s confidence about your case and prognosis, I would tend to agree. Those symptoms often pass with time (a few weeks). Continuing the rehab during this phase is patient specific and I would defer to your Doc and therapist. Patients will often continue rehab despite this, but try to work around it so you don’t get sharp bursts of pain – generally that’s not a great thing. Usually you modify your rehab or rest from it altogether. You might be doing a little too much. The recovery can seem a little slow in the early phases. If you have a full recovery and your problems are resolved, I can’t see why you couldn’t return to martial arts or every thing else. Best.

  9. Adrian Makea says:

    Hello Doctor,
    i had a surgical dislocation of the right hip performed last year in feb, with 2 screws put in. since i woke from surgery i had really bad pain which lasted for 7-8months. everymonth i explained how bad the pain still was and it wasnt till the 7th month he opted to get another mri done and it confirmed that the screws were the issue and needed to come out. he said the region wasnt healing with the screws there. so october last year i had another opperation which was the removal of screws and bone graft. where 2 more screw were put in, i have the old ones. immediatly after waking ppst op i noticed the pain level had dropped dramaticaly but was still there so i thought i would give it time. now since the second opp my left side started hurting out of the blue and i told my surgeon. the pain got really intense, so he ordered an mri and what do you know i needed surgery again. this time performing a arthroscopy which was done march 1st. since then i have healed farr better than the other side but because i had to put weight off that side my right side is getting worse, with shooting pains down the back of knee and inner thigh. i have told my surgeon this and is ordering yet another mri etc.. i have had enough, its killing my life and am wanting to take this to the health commisioner. i am only 24years old is this normal? why a different procedure the 3rd time around and do you think i have a case? help please

    Adrian

    • JonHyman says:

      I’m not sure exactly what you mean by asking “do I have a case”? There may be reasons for your symptoms which are surgically related or they may relate to your specific anatomy or activity. It is hard to tell by email/posting. For a formal review of your specific case, feel free to contact us. However, I would recommend an open and honest discussion with your surgeon as to his impression for the ongoing problems with your right leg. It sounds like there could be some ongoing mirrors irritability or soft tissue problems that are causing the pain pattern you describe. Unfortunately your story is not so very uncommon. It is difficult sometimes to tell where a patient’s symptoms are referring from. Don’t give up. Hopefully it can be figured out and fixed.

  10. Rich HipPain says:

    Thank you Dr. I am 31 yrs old have extreme pain following a double labral tear in my rt hip that was repaired arthroscopically two years ago. The procedure, extensive arthroscopic debridement acetabular labrum and extensive synovectomy of rt hip. I followed all of the post op instruction and at pt I gave 100% everyday and it also included aqua-therapy. Currently I stopped all narcotic pills for pain, I only use a fentanyl patch 50mkgrams every 72 hours. The surgeon doesn’t really have a clear explanation as to why I’m still in this much pain, he says that my injury was sever removing my leg from the socket during surgery was very difficult??? Not sure what that really means. We think there is nerve damage, he says I’m too young for a hip replacement. I am a PO and can’t return to work do to the amount of pain I’m in day to day. What’s a nerve block? Is that a option? Not sure what to do, I want to get back to mylife I have a 8 month old and I’m nervous about not being able to run after her. Any suggestions I get a lot of popping and snapping average pain level is 6 and on he last dayofthe patch it’s like a 9. Thanks for your time dr.

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry to hear of your difficulties. The fact that you are on narcotic patch medication two years after your surgery is very concerning from several standpoints.

      There may be more extensive degenerative joint disease in your hip than was initially understood or it may have progressed. It is difficult to know without x-rays and or MRI. If the traction and distraction process was very difficult for your hip it could mean that there was some evidence of osteoarthritis present or that there was significant pressure in your genital area, among other things. There is certainly a possibility of nerve problems, based on what you have described.

      A nerve block would be a potential treatment option for intractable or persistent neurologic pain. If you are considering that please have an open frank and candid conversation with your doctor regarding the risk and benefits of this.

      I don’t have sufficient information to provide you adequate recommendation for medical advice, but I am happy to review your records for you in a second opinion. If you would like to pursue that please contact our office.

  11. Lori says:

    Hello, and thank you for taking time for my comment.
    I will be five weeks post open for three small labral tears, bone shaving(there was an odd “pit” in the bone that needed addressing) and IT band release. Up to this point things had been going very well with healing, PT, etc. But pretty much as soon as I was able to walk without crutches my back started killing me. I have had issues with my back for many years which usually were greatly helped with a tractioning table at my chiropractors office. Now, since he’s unable to traction fully so as not to disturb my hip my lower back is constantly in spasm and pain and terribly misaligned. I even have sciatic pain. This has even affected my mid back. Your advice, please on what I can do. When could he gently traction again? This back pain is also making the healing hip hurt so much more.
    Thank you.

    • JonHyman says:

      Difficult situation. I would suggest a frank and open conversation with the physician who treats your back condition. Consider Aquatic based exercise, massage and manual traction therapy perhaps. Formal traction can often be allowed at six weeks after surgery. The circumstances of each case vary and should be discussed with your physician. Thank you.

  12. Tracy says:

    Hello Dr. I have had repair and shaving of bone spurs from both hips twice. The first surgeon did not shave enough off to stop the pinching so a new surgeon went in and re-did both hips. Healing has gone well. The last hip done was my right in Dec. of 2011. Now starting a few months ago in the right hip Im starting have pinching and sharp pain when sitting, squatting, etc. Now I have a new development my right hip hurts so much I cannot walk without severe pain and severe limping. I actually had to use my crutches to get into my house after driving home and had to continue using them around the house. I am glad my husband was there or I would of been crawling up my driveway. I will be 40 this year and was looking forward to all of this being behind me. I have also had chronic back pain for 6 years but feel like that has nothing to do with the hip. This pain is something totally new. Thanks for taking the time to read and respond.

    • JonHyman says:

      Even though your back pain is separate, it can influence how your hip pain is experienced and how you move, compensate. Something sounds wrong if you are limping severely. I would strongly encourage you to have a thorough evaluation by your surgeon. Sounds like despite two surgeries, your right hip area is still quite compromised. Makes me suspicious if you really have the correct diagnosis. Maybe shaving bone spurs wasn’t really going to fix the problem?

  13. Tina says:

    Hello and Thank you in advance, I am 46 year old female who had been in pain for approx 6 months prior to surgery. I had tried therapy and injection before getting MRI for correct diagnosis. I had orthoscopic surgery on July 11th and OS found medial gluteal tear, labral tear, alot of bursitis and synovitis. The tears did not need to be sutured. OS just did alot of debridment. My question, I am at 4 1/2 weeks now and felt great. I have started doing PT but within the last week things seem to have changed. I cant tolerate as much standing and walking that I had been. Also swelling has returned in my upperthigh area. Is this normal for a set back or have I been doing too much.
    Tina

    • JonHyman says:

      It is difficult to tell via emessaging. It’s possible you’ve been overdoing it, or that the tissue could have been repaired and wasn’t, or that the condition of your hip was so bad that it was irreparable. You should discuss your symptoms and concerns with the surgeon AND the physical therapist.

  14. Kris says:

    Hello,

    I had a full anterior hip replacement 10 months ago at 49 years old. The recovery was tough for about 6 weeks and then I started feeling so well that I forgot I even had the surgery. I started playing singles tennis again about a month ago. The last 10 days I have been limping and just today have the old groin/ hip pain. I stopped playing tennis when the pain cam back but it seems worse each day and I am not icing it.

    Would appreciate your advice…..

    • JonHyman says:

      Glad you have been able to be active on your hip replacement, however, they are not designed for tennis. That being said I would strongly encourage you to see your physician for examination and x-rays and reduce recreational activity until that time. There could be a mechanical problem or it could be just overuse but you need to be checked.

      The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

  15. Jessie says:

    I had labral tear hip surgery on 7-17-2012 , they shaved the bone, and cleaned up some other things, on my pre op visit I was told the tear could not be fixed because it was so thin? My question is I am still in alot of pain, its hard for me to lift my leg, and im having alot of groin pain , and it shoots in the socket area. My Dr gave me a shot in the hip to help with the pain on 9-13-2012..I did not get much relief with that. I am 36 years old. I am just worried something is still not right . I have to go back in Nov 2 see the Dr again. I just fed up with being in so much pain every day. And turning some ways sends a shocking pain into my groin..Any advise out there please!!
    thanks so much , jessie

    • JonHyman says:

      3.5 months after surgery, it would not seem like you should be in that type of pain. If the shot in Sept did not help your pain, it raises the question of whether or not the pain is coming from the area which was injected. Make sure you discuss this in detail with your surgeon.

  16. Randy Boschee says:

    In Dec 1999 I had a my left hip replaced. I was 42. For 10 years everything was great, then due to migration of the ball into my hip I had a revision in April of 2010. They placed a metal socket in place of the plastic sleeve from the first surgery. They plastic sleeve had deteriorated and caused bone loss. As a result required a bone graft due to previous bone loss. Now 2 1/2 years I am again experiencing pain in my left hip (buttocks). Lots of sharp pain when I try to sit or rise from a seated position. Any ideas on what is causing the pain? Don’t want another surgery, any other options? Thanks for reading

    • JonHyman says:

      There are too many possibilities to list here. It sounds like you need a careful physical examination and some updated xrays, at a minimum.

  17. Wendy says:

    Hi, my husband had hip artho. shaving of the bone and one spur on his right hip 5 months ago , and they told him he would be able to walk in a day or so and he could not til and 3 to 4 weeks after surg, and still having pain and mainly numb and burning feeling in his right top upper thiegh…He is wondering if it is still normal or could it be never damage?? Thanks

    • JonHyman says:

      This sounds like Meralgia Paresthetica or irritation/injury of the Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve (LFCN). You should discuss this possibility with your surgeon.

  18. Ashle says:

    Hi my name is Ashle. I am now 22 years old and have had 4 arthroscopic hip surgeries. (1 on my left and 3 on my right). I was 17 years old when i had my first one and my Dr misdiagnosed me and just “fixed” a labral tear just to shut me up about my pain in my right hip. He was my 2nd Dr to misdiagnose me. My 3d Dr. was great! It took him one look at my arthrogram MRI pics to know what was wrong. He then scheduled me for surgery for 2 months later. He did a right hip arthroscopy, osteoplasty, rim trim, labral repair and micro fracture of acetabulum and IT band lengthening. 8 months later I had labral repair surgery to my left. (i had FAI in both hips) But i fell on my right hip 8 months post op and thats when i underwent my 3 surgery for my right side. The third time i had labral re-tear, capsular laxity, recurrent impingement and iliopsoas tendonitis. I still have pain all the time…im wondering if impingement’s can grow back? I don/t have insurance right now. But the pain i have is almost the same before my surgery. The first surgery with this last Dr. i was 90% better till i fell on it…Very frustrating when you can go for long walks or can’t sit/stand for long periods of time and forget having sex. It seems to be getting worse…got any advice?

    • JonHyman says:

      There are too many possibilities to list here. It sounds like you need a careful physical examination and some updated xrays, at a minimum. Impingement can recur but it is quite uncommon. Something else may be involved, or there may be another factor which has led to your development of these conditions at such a young age, an ‘X-factor’ which has yet to be determined.

  19. Y Hosni says:

    Thanks in advance Dr Hyman. I had a hip scope done since 22 days, in which there was removal of cam and pincer lesions and labral repair with 3 anchors. No chondral lesions. I was advised to toe touch. I was doing fine till 2 days ago when I tripped and had to to support my body on my injured leg, which moved backwards. Since then I feel pain at the groin and at the back of hip, which was not there before the fall. Could the anchors pull out? What to do?
    I appreciate your time and effort

    • JonHyman says:

      While anchors can pull out, it is extremely rare. That said, it depends upon how well they were put in and the quality of the anchors and your tisse(bone, labrum etc). It’s much more likely that you just strained some tisse and caused a short term inflammatory reaction. These usually resolve within a a week or a few weeks. Please discuss with your therapist and surgeon.

  20. amy says:

    Hi there. Thanks in advance for your insight. I had a complete left labral tear repair on the left hip 9-14-12. My doctor put in two anchors. I also had impingement (FAI). Synovectomy, chondroplasty and psoas tendon release were done. There was significant inflammation. I think he said that of the 4 mm of cartilage ALL of it was damaged and inflammed/awful looking so he took away 2 mm of it; leaving me with 2 mm of it in the 2:00 position. Prior to surgery (and even now/still), I also have ITB and bursitis. Since surgery, I have been dealing with both a femoral nerve stretch (now resolved, thank goodness) and a pedendal nerve stretch (not resolved), as well so it’s not been easy to say the least.
    Anyway, in the last 2 weeks my pain has sky-rocketed, though my activity level has not changed. I have been having popping in my hip that is associated with great pain. I have felt as if my hip is “subluxing” and my leg is going to give way and I am going to fall to the ground. There are definite stability issues which seem similar to pre surgery and my pain is awful, both at the groin area and also at the 2:00 and outward positions. I am going to see my doctor on Wed. Over the phone, we talked about an MRI /or other imaging and possibly a cortisone injection, as he feels this may be the cartilage issue. It doesnt seem right to have this much pain nearly six weeks post operatively. I am living on Motrin and my pain is high. I am feeling my stability, balance and pain are worse than pre surgery and have been going to therapy, etc.
    THoughts? Do you think something is wrong?

  21. amy says:

    It’s Amy again (same as above). Last Friday, my urogyno ordered a pelvic soft tissue MRI secondary to pelvic issues such as numbness and stool loss possibly from pedendal nerve stretch? Results back today and one remarkable finding is that it showed L5/S1 disc degeneration with a broad disc bulge and bilateral foraminal stenosis. I did have some mild referred back pain before surgery and now but my urogyno feels this bulge could be contributing to my bowel/bladder issues. Could this bulge have occurred from positioning/traction etc while on the table for surgery?
    I have been told several times that my slight stature has worked against me (femoral nerve stretch, possible pedendal nerve stretch vs. L5/S1 bulge) insofar as that I have a hypersensitive response to the compression/traction etc. Thoughts?

    • JonHyman says:

      I would ask your surgeon if your capsule was repaired or if it was loose. We cut the capsule to get into the joint. Unrepaired capsules or very loose capsules can lead to symptoms you’ve described.

      Deep Infection may need to be ruled out.

      If you have nerve damage/injury, that alone could affect neuromotor control.

      I would think it highly unlikely that the procedure or traction caused your disc bulge. Your neurological issues w bowel and bladder are more likely related to traction and your underlying sensitivity. Ask your surgeon how long you were in traction. With your genital sensation numbness it may more result from nerve compression on the post than from traction.

      • amy says:

        Thank you so much for replying back to me. I really appreciate it. I couldn’t find the thread until just now. The neurosurgeon ordered a dedicated lumbar MRI after the pelvic one. He feels the issues did not contribute to the bowel/bladder or continued hip ones, rather were separate ones. Those bowel issues are resolved now. Pelvic issues about 90% resolved. I was in traction for 1 hour 5 minutes.
        I got a joint shot for pain at the hospital a couple of weeks ago for pain. It was so painful I couldnt see straight. The radiologist mentioined something about capsulitis. Is this the same thing you are referring to above that may be contributing to my continued problems with my hip post surgery? By the way, I am coming to see you for a second opinion in Jan. 2013 and I am counting the days!!!!!!!!

  22. shawn says:

    Hi i am 33 yrs old been working in welding shops since i was 14 on aug 28 2012 i had anthroscopic surgery on my left hip i have had problems from it for a few yrs i am 9 weeks postop and still in alot of pain its always there and i get sharp pains if i turn the wrong way and during physical therapy sumtimes to the point i dont want to move it is soo frustrating i also have scoliosis and back pain i was told the surgery would help both my back but it seems i am alot worse now is it normal for it to be like this will it get better? I also tripped on my crutches 2 days after surgery and caught myself on my bad leg

    • JonHyman says:

      Shawn, the amount of pain you are describing is worrisome, as is the notion that fixing your hip would somehow predictably help your back. Many patients still experience pain for 2-3 months post op but it should be getting better and should not be very sharp or intense in most cases. Please discuss this with your surgeon.

  23. shawn says:

    Ok ty for your input and advice the surgeon has told me to keep up on my therapy which i am pushing myself on and to play the waiting game (lets see how u feel in a month) his words maybe he doesn’t realize tht it is worse than before surgery i will keep you posted

  24. Tracey says:

    I had a laberal tear on the right hip when the consultant went in to repair it, it was alot worse than he first thought, he ended up having to also shave the cartilage, this was done 23.8.2012 and since the operation I have been in severe pain every day, I went back to see the consultant who told me there was also another tear, but they did not repair it at the time as he was worried it may cause arthritis? They decided to put a steroid injection into the site on the 5.10.2012, but the pain is still as bad it is in my groin above my hip in my back on my hip aswell and in my cocycx, I still keep getting pain down the front of the leg and into my foot, I also experience pins and needles in my foot.

    • JonHyman says:

      It sounds like you are having nerve irritation symptoms (pain, pins & needles), coccyx pain, low back pain, groin pain and hip pain. Infection may need to be ruled out. If the injection they put in your hip joint did not help your pain, that suggests that your pain may be coming from locations outside of your hip. Sorry for your difficulty. Please continue to let your doctor know of your troubles.

  25. Desperate says:

    Hello, I was diagnosed with fai on both left and right hips also with full labral tears on both sides. My surgeon repaired L labrum with 2 anchors and trimmed back acetabulum. All was well for 6 months post surgery, then R side started to ache and L side started to ache with sharp pain. At 1 yr after surgery MRI on L confirmed labrum has not mended or healed. My surgeon has recently left the province and now I must wait 9 months to 1 yr to meet new Dr. I limp and all activity is limited. What can be done for L side that did not heal?thank you I feel desperate.

    • JonHyman says:

      Don’t have any clear solutions given your limited access to healthcare. Injection therapy, use of a cane, pills, and repeat surgery sound like options, but you have to be able to get to a doctor for those.

  26. Larry says:

    EHello DR

    I am 2 years out of labral/fai repair. In had extensive damage in my joint but I am happy to report i have zero joint pain and excellent range of motion.

    What I am still dealing with is hip flexor tendonitis, it tightens and seems to shorten causing discomfort. What do u usually recommend? I have tried NSAIDs and all kinds of different stretches and strengthing.

    I am sceduled for labral/fai repair on my left in a week. It is not as painful as the right, it just pinches when I squat or pass 90 degrees. I MRI shows a small tear, but I would rather just take care of it now for hopefully a faster recovery.

    I am looking forward to be able to finally get back to balancing my core as I am restricted to certain excersises. I think all the core hip muscles need to work symetrically other wise those imbalances never let you get 100 percent

    One last to all others it can take up to a year to feel semi normal so do not get discouraged. Muscle issues with psoas can mimic pre surgery pain FYI

    Thanks larry

    • JonHyman says:

      Thanks. glad you are doing well. If NSAIDS and rehab don’t work, injection therapy (cortisone, PRP, and even botox at times) can be indicated. Sometimes, ultrasound/iontopheresis and Dry Needling can be quite helpful too. Depends upon the cause. If your tendons are compensating for the extensive damage in the joint, it may not go away, or stay away for long. Best regards.

  27. Jason says:

    Hello Dr.,

    Context

    Three weeks ago I had surgery to address hip impingement, a partially ossified labrum, and some cartilage degeneration in the acetabulum.

    During the procedure, the doctor smoothed out the femoral head, debrided/removed the ossified section of the labrum, cleaned up and then made microfractures in the the area of the acetabulum where I was missing cartilage in an effort to stimulate new “cartilage” to grow.

    From here, the plan is to be on crutches for 6 weeks to let my hip socket heal and then in a few months perform another procedure to verify the success of the microfractures, and fix the labrum via cadaver graft.

    Question
    I am having quite a bit of localized pain in my hip flexor on that side, and a feeling of “looseness” in the hip. It is throbbing pain and tender to the touch. It subsides a bit with ice, but is still unpleasant. Do you have any recommendations for how to address it?

    Cheers,
    J

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry for your difficulties. How to address that pain depends upon it’s cause. It may be quite normal for your procedure, in which case it may run its course and resolve on its own. Make sure your doc is aware, and rules out infection if he/she thinks that is approp. If you had a lot of labral tissue removed, your hip may be under duress. This can cause tendonitis, bursitis and other soft tissue compensation. If the capsule was not repaired in that setting, increased laxity and joint subluxation can occur and can cause problems in some instances. Please discuss with your physician.

  28. Kathleen says:

    Hello,
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge. I had hip arthroscopy done on my left hip in March ’12 and I am still having pain. My mobility seems to be good, but some problems going up the stairs.I was used to doing a lot of walking, now I can’t walk for long periods at all, otherwise I have terrible pain at night. The pain goes from the hip all the way down my leg. At times the pain is horrible. It feels like a nerve. My doctor says that the hip pain is not responsible for the leg pain. I don’t believe him. I also have bursitis in the hip. After the surgery he said there was no sign of bursitis, but now I have it when I sleep on that side. What test do you recommend for diagnosing my continuing problems. He offered to give me a shot, but I declined. It never helped me before. Thanks for your information.

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry for your difficulties. A follow up MRI arthrogram with local anesthetic in the joint is reasonable. Ultrasound in the office is another screening test which may be valuable. Nerve pain would be best assessed by EMG/NCS and neurology. It may be from traction or pressure.

  29. Jennifer says:

    I am 38 and in pretty good health. I had surgery Oct 12, 2012. The dr said the tare was worse then he thought and he ended up putting four anchors in my left hip. I have been in so much pain since. Three weeks post op I had to go to the ER because of swelling and my leg was turning blue. I staid in the hospital for three days to make sure there was no blood clots. Thank god none was found. I fallowed up with my Orthopedic surgeon to make sure all was ok, he said I wasn’t getting enough blood to my lower extremities and I should start doing little exercises and try to put 25% of my weight on my leg now. It has been three weeks since I seen him and my leg is still turning purple and swelling somedays. I can’t get around without my crushes at all. I try doing the excise he gave me but when I am done I hurt so bad for the next few days. The pain starts at my hip and shoots down to my knee down my shins to my feet they get cold and numb. Some times the pain shoots down my groan with a sharp sting. I am still taking pain Meds on a daily base. Is this all normal? My husband seems to think I should be off my crushes around the house by now. What do you think? I am so frustrated now because I’m not sure where I should be in my healing process. All I know is I am in major pain all day and I’m tired of trying to tell people how bad it hurts. Can you tell me if this pain is normal after six weeks? what questions can I ask my Dr on my next apt?

    • JonHyman says:

      That doesn’t sound like the usual recovery at all. Glad you had blood clots ruled out. You seem to have a vasomotor disturbance, with nerve hypersensitivity and dilation of the small blood vessels in your leg, thus causing the color changes, coldness and numbness.

      Things you could consider discussing with your doctor:
      -the possibility of infection
      -possibility of nerve irritation from traction? ie how long were your legs pulled in traction during the procedure
      -using TED hose for leg compression to help with the swelling and pain

      best

  30. Jennifer says:

    Thank you for your insight, it really helps. I saw my Dr today and he said I’ll be starting PT and that should help with the blood flow. I asked about my pain and told him how bad my knee hurt, he just said let’s try PT and fallow up with him in six weeks. I’ll be sure to ask these questions you suggested. I just wish the Dr prepared me more for the recovery. This can cause a person to fall into a state of depression. This recovery is so much harder and painful then I ever imagined.
    Thanks again

  31. Kyle Olson says:

    My name is Kyle (29m NW Indiana) and I am 26 days post-op for ‘Hip Arthroscopy, with Femoral Osteoplasty and Labral Repair’ on my right hip.. I had waited a significant amount of time (about 2 years) to have this surgery done. I had wrist surgery (ulna osteotomy) a few years back and I didn’t want to go through a recovery like that again. I finally gave in, after trying several didn’t things to resolve it not surgically.
    Anyways, I am now 26 days post-op and I have some intermittent groin tightness/pain and some numbness across the front and outside of my thigh. The surgeon remarked that the labrum had been torn off the bone and he was able to repair the labram and keep it in place by 4 ‘bone anchors’. He also shaved about the ‘pincer’ and part of the femoral head/neck.
    A couple of days after surgery I did have an audible ‘POP’ in my inner groin area after trying to gently lift my foot onto a pillow (no pain, just an audible POP). On top of that I have had about 9-10 ‘POP’s in my internal hip/groin area since then (pain/swelling usually follows the popping sound). This was one of the original symptoms I had spoken to my surgeon about. Needless to say, this makes me very, very frustrated. I wonder if I also have some sort of iliopsoas (sp?) problems that he didn’t notice or what. Or, I am a bit worried that I may have ‘overdid’ it at PT or at home or something. The popping usually occurs if I try to force the weight of my leg onto my hip. I have scheduled an additional appointment with my surgeon for 09/09/2013 to speak with him about my concerns.
    Sorry for all the rambling, but it’s been weighing pretty heavily on my mind lately. Anyways, does any of this sound normal? Also, if someone could answer the question, ‘What are the chances of reinjuring, or ‘undoing’ what the surgeon did during surgery’? Whenever I hear one of those pops (which almost always happens when I am laying on my back and extending my forward) I get very worried that I just screwed up the repair job =(.

    Any words of advice would be GREATLY appreciated.

    Thank you everyone,
    Kyle Olson

    • JonHyman says:

      Thanks. Popping is common after surgery and not usually a problem. Definitely ask your doc about your specific case. It is very uncommon to ‘un do’ a repair per se, though healing can be incomplete or delayed for many different reasons. 4 weeks is very early in the healing time, and 3 months for labral repair is quite common. Best to you.

  32. Bex says:

    Hi I am a 39 year old female and had a hip arthroscopy in feb, Labral tear and shaved some of the bone. I am still on restricted duties at work (care assistant) as unable to stand for long periods due to lower back pain into buttock area (sacroiliac area) I also am having constant pain in my groin area right at the top/front of my left thigh, which hurts like mad when I cough or sneeze! I have recently had an MRI scan on back which showed nothing and due to have an ultrasound scan tomorrow on the front as they think I may have a hernia, personally I don’t feel I have! The other problem which I’m hoping someone can shed some light on is that since the op I have been unable to lift my leg up from the hip while in the sitting position, I have to physically lift my leg up on to the bed etc and more importantly had to sell my car for an automatic as I couldn’t lift it to use the clutch! My surgeon and my physio say its a mystery and they have never seen it before!! I feel as tho my leg is just dead! My physio thinks they caused some muscle damage while actually having the operation but my surgeon denies this. I have had both muscle & nerve conduction tests which came back as normal so there no sign of nerve or muscle damage or even weakness, but my physio still thinks he has damaged some muscle!? There was mention of a capsule being damaged but do not understand!!? They say the pain im getting and my inability to move my leg are not even connected! My physio has been stopped due to them not being able to do any exercises with me until they know more about what they are dealing with. I struggle with stairs, cannot run or even walk for long periods, oh and im still limping! Has anyone had the same problem or even heard if this problem would love to hear, thankyou in advance

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness.
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase

  33. Angela Shaw says:

    Hi am 37 years old I was diagnosed with a laberal tear in my hip I had surgery in January 2013 with a debrivment 2/3 of my labrum was removed I am in worse pain have no range of motion pain in my groin and butt and pain shooting down the top of my thigh I can not put full pressure on my hip I use a cane I did not receive any therapy after surgery but it is now September 5th and my surgeon wants me in intense physiotherapy and says I have chronic pain and will not beable to get a hip replacement because im to young and don’t have arthritis in my hip but how would he know when I haven’t had an xray or mri after surgery really struggling have had this injury for 2years 3month tell me what should I do I feel this surgeon is not helpfull

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness.
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase.

  34. SusanZ says:

    I had full traditional hip replacement in Feb of 2013, now almost 9 months ago.Posterior. Both hips are bone on bone, but the right hip is where I had severe groin pain, it became so severe I couldn’t walk within days of the onset of the groin pain. I had lower back pain for years which the doctor said was caused by the hips. I had a large subcondral cyst and several bone spurs. I have an uncemented hip, and I am a 55 year old female, 5’8 and 130 lbs, I was always active and very physically fit until this hip issue. Post surgery, I did very well the first couple of months, but have never been able to stand on the leg I had surgery, I have to sit to get dressed, and it’s very difficult to shower, put on socks, drive, get in or out of a car, bed, off the couch, and continue to need a cane and a walker for long distance. The past 6 weeks it feels like I never had the surgery, I have severe groin pain again, pain down my thigh and it’s like I can feel the rod in my thigh? I do get pain the back side where the incision was done. I have been on LTD, and due to RA and other auto immune disorders I am going on SSD. This has totally destroyed my career as an outside sales rep for almost 40 years, but I can not sit, stand, walk, or get comfortable in any position for more then 30 minutes. I had an x ray last time I saw the surgeon in July and everything looked ok he said. That some people heal slower and my hips were so bad at the time of surgery, and my other health issues will make recovery more difficult. Now with the onset of groin pain, I am concerned. I am seeing the doctor on Monday, it also feels very tight around the top of my thigh. I can not walk without holding on to something in the house or I will trip, and have a numbness in my right leg. I have a full metal prosthesis, and have read about possible metal shavings? recalls? how do I find out if what type of implant I had? I need to get a copy of what was done in surgery, I totally trust this doctor, he came highly recommended, and don’t think it was something he did wrong. I have read that this just sometimes happens, and this may be as good as it gets. I thought at almost 9 months I would be able to bend or crouch down, clean my floors, be more active, but I have been pretty much confined to home, I can’t even walk into a grocery store. The doctors advised I should just stay out of work, since stress, and the physical activity can make the RA worse. I have both OA and RA, EBV, Lupus, Graves, and Hashimoto’s, all happened at one time. So I am not very happy where all this has taken me over the past year. Could the auto immune disorders I have be the cause of the groin pain?

    Please advise,

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness.
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase.

  35. Ali says:

    Hello I am 16 years old and I had hip arthroscopy 1 month ago. And I had my bone shaved. I am a soccer player and the only way to get back into sports was this so I got the surgery and I got 3 anchors inserted. One day at school I kind of turned and I felt a pop and a major pain in my joint. The pain subsided but this problem happened 4 more times while I’m replying to this. So I here a pop and then a pain but almost immediately subsides. Please help as I really want to play sports again I really do not want to go back into surgery. Could this possibly be something small or could this be as big as an anchor falling out help would be appreciated.

    • Ali says:

      I actually was able to go up stairs and speed walk about 3 weeks after surgery my hip almost always pops but the popping with the pain is really scaring me I had my femur shaved and I had an avulsion fracture that was actually pushing on my cartilage that was shaved down aswell so it may be caused from that but I am very worried and really eager to get back to sports as I am only 16 and have been out for 1 year already a response would really help me

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase.

  36. Jamie Abbott says:

    Hello Dr Hyman,

    I am a 37 year old male from the UK . 6 and half months ago I had a Hip Athroscopy. The surgeon repaired a Labral tear with 2 anchors and shaved a cam impingment. I had a little cartlidge damage . My recovery was going well and between weeks 6 and weeks 12 I was pain free. However the last 4 months have been terrible. I get very very tight hip flexors when I sit at my desk and a heavy ache/pain. I dont have any pain while walking or climbing stairs. I do not limp either. I also have good range of motion in the hip and no stiffness. The heavy ache/ pain I think is coming from the tendons or muscle especially when sat at my desk.. I do all my stretches and that takes the pain and tightness away, but as soon as I sit down the heavy ache comes back. and the muscles in the front of the hip go really tight. I am wondering if it could be Illioposas Bursitis ? I have done my best to explain the symptoms. Do they make any sense to you Dr Hyman. Kind Regards.

  37. SusanZ says:

    Had X ray 3 days ago, X rays show implant is fine, having a c-protein/sed rate biopsy next Thursday to see if infection is present, groin pain is getting worse, feels as if I never had full hip replacement. Groin pain is almost unbearable with movement

  38. Stephanie says:

    Five months ago I had a labral tear and a some bone shave off because it was abnormal and there was a hip arthroscopy surgery done on me. I went to PT which didn’t help at all and caused more pain. I was still in a lot of pain after this surgery where the pain radiated from the outside of my thigh to the inside of my pelvis traveling down my leg. My leg would also feel like it was going numb and tingling sometimes. I also had the discomfort of where the inside of my pelvis would rub against something and also get stuck and then pop free which caused pain. I just had my second hip arthroscopic surgery done because of this pain and my doctor said that it was scar tissue but at times I feel like I need to pop my leg and there is something rubbing on the inside of my thigh and I also have burning pain. This surgery was more painful than the first time with my leg. Is this normal after surgery?

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness.
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase

  39. kim says:

    Hi, I had hip artho for FAI 11 months ago. Im still having pains and my hip giving out on me. I still cant lift my leg hardly and climbing stairs is difficult. He did say i was bone on bone when he did this surgery.

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness.
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase.

  40. Nora S. says:

    I had L. Hip revision surgery in Feb. 2012. Everything was replaced except the stem. I am hurting all the time in my l. hip, part line area and my thigh. It stays so sore. Since the stem was not replaced could it be causing all the pain I’m suffering with. I’ve begged my surgeon for help but, he has no idea what to do. Please help with any idea of what to do.

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase.

  41. Shawna says:

    Hello, my question is simple. I am one year post op, labrum tear. My hip is only sore sometimes. Like when sitting in the drivers seat of a car, upon exciting the car i pop my hip and it releases the discomfort. There are other positions as well that induce the same scenario. It seems like it’s right in the joint. Any ideas what might be popping in there? Is me popping it, causing harm? I think if I didn’t, I would be uncomfortable regularly. Thank you! :)

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

  42. Angela says:

    I had hip arthroscopy 10 days ago to repair the labrum on my left hip and shave a bone spur that was catching, on the front of it. The surgeon also shaved a small spur on the femur head. I was surprised that I was full weight-bearing with crutches from the first day. I don’t know if it had anything to do with the fact that I am very light weight, 100 lbs. I get really stir crazy and I’ve done a lot of walking on it since and I’m wondering can I harm the anchors in any way. I don’t do well on pain meds but the pain was minor compared to how it is now, after being more mobile. I really just use the crutches for stability because it hurts my upper body to put my weight on them.
    Can I be harming all the work that was done I’m not really concerned about the pain more than the actual physical damage, especially to labral repair. I don’t want this all to be for nothing.
    Also, I have mild congenital hip dysplasia, worse on the left side. Both joints lack lateral coverage.
    I am told that I will eventually need both hips replaced and /or an osteotomy on the left side, if not both. My cartilage is good, the lack of bone is the problem. But I’m not looking that far in the future, I just want to get through this but the best possible outcome. Any advice, much appreciated.

    • JonHyman says:

      We have recently been inundated with requests from patients for explanations and insights into their hip pain after surgery. Most patients have had hip arthroscopy and are having persistent pain, though many have had hip replacement surgery and are having persistent pain. The sheer volume of these inquiries strongly suggests a few observations are valid:
      1. Pain after surgery is not an uncommon phenomenon.
      2. Many patients do not have adequate communication and correspondence with their operating surgeon.
      3. Patients are seeking information online without adequately being able to share all of the salient and relevant points that could help illicit a qualified response.

      There are many reasons why your pain may be persisting after surgery. I thought I would list some of the more common reasons so that you may consider these and discuss them with your surgeon in detail.
      1. Technical errors or complications during surgery. These will be hard to discern and will require integrity and honesty on the part of your surgeon.
      2. Realizing that the healing process is an extended one. For example, after a labral repair, it is common to still feel the symptoms of a labral tear for a few months after the surgery because the labrum has not healed yet and sometimes takes 3, even 4, months to heal fully after surgery. Therefore, since there is still technically a labral tear after surgery, although it is sutured, it is not fully healed and therefore one should not necessarily expect the pain of the labral tear to be gone until after it is fully healed. Cartilage, ligament, bone, muscle, tendon, synovial membrane, etc, all heal at different rates and will likely cause different symptoms along the postoperative recovery process.
      3. Possible infection. This is a rare complication, but it is at least one worth discussing.
      4. Tendonitis or bursitis from over zealous rehabilitation or physical therapy. This could be due to over exertion on the part of the therapist, or due to over exertion on part of the patient.
      5. Too rapid a return to exercise or activity. Many patients don’t have adequate guidance as to when they can return to certain types of activities and they may be premature in doing so, thus aggravating their hip or condition, and causing recurrent inflammation or persistent problems.
      6. Physiology and metabolism. Obviously, we are not all the same, and some people heal at slower rates or to varying degrees. Your diet, your metabolism, your genetics that you inherited from Mom and Dad, your immune system, possibly your stress level and attitude and perspective, can all have an influence on your experience of your pain.
      7. The pain generator or source of pain may not have been fully identified or addressed. Many patients have more pathology or problems than just the hip joint and if those other things are still active after surgery, there can be persistent pain. These things might include but are not limited to:
      1. Low back dysfunction
      2. Cartilage, ligament, or capsule dysfunction
      3. Persistent impingement or bony irregularity, muscle, tendon tightness or inflammation
      4. Scar tissue, like a keloid scar that some people form, but internally
      5. Neuromechanical dysfunction with nerve irritation from traction, pressure, stress, or a hyper sensitive nervous system.
      8. Recurrent synovitis, which is redness or inflammation in the joint. This could respond, as could tendonitis or bursitis, to a short course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, or a Medrol Dose Pack or two, or a cortisone injection in the inflamed tissue area or in the joint. You would need to discuss which medications, if any, were appropriate, with your physician.
      9. Re-injury
      10. Failure of repair or anchor fixation. Loose anchors or sutures.
      11. Muscle imbalance, asymmetry, or weakness.
      12. Leg length discrepancy
      13. Traction issues or problems that were not detected before surgery that are worsened after surgery due to the use of crutches or abnormal walking for extended periods of time in the postoperative phase.

  43. Jamie Abbott says:

    Hello Dr Hyman,

    I am a 37 year old male from the UK . 6 and half months ago I had a Hip Athroscopy. The surgeon repaired a Labral tear with 2 anchors and shaved a cam impingment. I had a little cartlidge damage . My recovery was going well and between weeks 6 and weeks 12 I was pain free. However the last 4 months have been terrible. I get very very tight hip flexors when I sit at my desk and a heavy ache/pain. I dont have any pain while walking or climbing stairs. I do not limp either. I also have good range of motion in the hip and no stiffness. The heavy ache/ pain I think is coming from the tendons or muscle especially when sat at my desk.. I do all my stretches and that takes the pain and tightness away, but as soon as I sit down the heavy ache comes back. and the muscles in the front of the hip go really tight. I am wondering if it could be Illioposas Bursitis ? I have done my best to explain the symptoms. Do they make any sense to you Dr Hyman. Kind Regards.

    • JonHyman says:

      You might want to consider talking to your surgeon about the status of your hip capsule and ligaments. It is unclear if they were repaired, or significantly loosened during your surgery. That can be a source of pain postoperatively as the type of hip you have can move around considerably in some cases. Iliopsoas tendonitis or bursitis or hip flexor tendonitis are also considerations, but make sure you mention the capsule and its stage of healing/repair.

      Part of the time for recovery is dictated by how big of a cut the surgeon makes in the ligaments to access the hip with the camera. We call this a capsulotomy. Sometimes they are repaired and sometimes they are left to heal on their own. Sometimes persistent tendonitis can be treated with non-steroidal or steroidal anti-inflammatories as well. Please discuss with your doctor.

  44. Jen says:

    I am a 43 yr old female 4 mths post op from hip labrel repair. Significant tear-5 sutures to repair. Was told prior to surgery the fact that I have mild dysplasia makes my hip a more complicated joint, and that the recovery could be longer. Post surgery was told I have a very large labrum, no debridement or bone shaving done due to the potential risk of complications due to my specific hip joint, so only laberal repair performed. Pre op my pain was in my groin and radiated down my thigh to the top of my knee. The pain was mainly from weight bearing, but had begun to have hip flexion pain but only when doing leg leg raises, extensions, etc, but no pain from normal activities like getting out of bed, etc. 4 mths post op now and the groin pain is better. The weight bearing pain in my groin I had pre op is much better. What I am experiencing now is severe hip flexion pain and some remaining thigh pain. My surgeon suggested discontinuing PT at 2 mths post op due to the pain, and at approx 3 mths post op I had a guided cortisone injection. The injection gave me relief from the hip flexion pain and from the remaining pain I had in my thigh. IT seems the thigh pain may be gone for good, but hip flexion pain has returned. My surgeon said that it may require two injections to get the hip capsule calmed down, and has also said I am still relatively early in my recovery due to the “type” hip joint I have. Do you think what I am experiencing is post op illiopsoas tendinitis (which I don’t think I had pre op), and that with time and therapy will get better, or do you think it’s possible that the surgery was not successful? Or, maybe it’s just too early to know??! Thanks for any thoughts you may have!

    Po

    P

    • JonHyman says:

      You might want to consider talking to your surgeon about the status of your hip capsule and ligaments. It is unclear if they were repaired, or significantly loosened during your surgery. That can be a source of pain postoperatively as the type of hip you have can move around considerably in some cases. Iliopsoas tendonitis or bursitis or hip flexor tendonitis are also considerations, but make sure you mention the capsule and its stage of healing/repair. Best regards.

  45. Mary Lucas says:

    Just had anterior hip replacement three weeks ago. Five months ago, I had my S.I., joint fused. Since I stopped taking pain meds, I have noticed extreme pain in the SI area. what would possibly help that? Post op appointment is in a few days. Incision is sore and tight and stiff and I am walking with a cane. Still pain putting more weight on that side. Thanks so much, Mary Lucas

    • JonHyman says:

      It is very difficult to tell by way of electronic communication given how recent your surgeries have been. Your pelvis is likely going through trauma and trying to adapt to its new circumstances. Please consult your physician with your concerns.

  46. Billy says:

    I am almost 3 yrs out from a hip scope and was doing fine until a couple months ago. Now the pain is so bad I can’t sleep on either side and cannot do any activity unless I ride my bike and that still hurts deep in my butt cheek on the side of the hip scope. It was always hard to sit on a 4 wheeler or snowmobile because my left leg cannot angle outward. I cannot do the butterfly stretch because the p ain is unbearable. Now it goes down to my knee and I have had special orthodics made for my tennis because I have a huge protrusion on my left outside of my foot. All of these things are on my left side.

    Just wondering what is next. I will be 40 in December and I hear that a hip replacement should not be done so young because I may have to have it revised and that is always an issue to how good it will take. I would maybe be 60 when that would take place. Scared and wondering what to do next. I cannot live like this. Hurts to sit at the kitchen table or ride in a car even. Would a cortisone shot help?

    Any ideas welcome.

    • JonHyman says:

      Sorry for your difficulties. It sounds like you need an updated set of x-rays and clinical examination to see if arthritis has developed and/or progressed. Strong anti-inflammatories orally or a cortisone shot in the joint might be of sustainable benefit.

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